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Maude Talbot, Holme Lee by Harriet Parr

Maude Talbot,

Holme Lee by Harriet Parr

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Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III. HONEST AND TRUE. Jessie had been gone little more thanMorePurchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free. This is an OCR edition with typos. Excerpt from book: CHAPTER III. HONEST AND TRUE. Jessie had been gone little more than a week- but that week had worked sad changes in her sisters face. It was a wet stormy night, and Nell sat cowered down over the fire, crying bitterly in her loneliness- her work neglected, and too ill and suffering to care that she had been ordered to bring it back by a certain time on peril of being refused any more: she was thoroughly broken down by her long night- weepings. A i-riendly breast to lean on and pour out her troubles would have been such a comfort It was at hand, though she knew it not. If her ear had been as quick as it used to be, she would have heard the firm tread ofa mans foot coming across the Court and stopping at the door- but she did not, and it came up the creaking stair, also unnoticed. The decisive knock at the door recalled her- she suffered it to be repeated, in the hope that the comer, whoever it might be, would depart- but after waiting a reasonable interval, he knocked a third time. Then Nell got up, crossed the floor wearily, and opened the door. At first, she could not see who stood in the shadow without- but as he advanced a step forward, she recognised him, and started back. Oh Geoffry Meynell, why do you come here ? she exclaimed hastily. Im come, Nellie, because I thought Id a right to come, replied the game-keeper, sturdily. Ive kept away as long as I could, since you bid me- but there is no reason, that I know of, why you should not like to see me: friends are none so plenty, Nellie, that we can afford to lose em. Dont tell me to go away, Nellie, till Ive said my say, for I wont do it- and having thus announced his determination, Geoffry Meynell sat down on a chair opposite the one into which Nellie had dropped. Then, it would seem, for the fir...